Auditorium room. Outside of Marriot Hotel at night. Picture of outdoor terrace. Picture of conference room.

Sessions

Presentations

A Framework Rubric: Using the ACRL Framework in Information Literacy Assessment
Emily Z. Brown and Susan Souza-Mort (Bristol Community College)
- Presentation (.pptx)
- Rubric (.docx)

Bristol Community College (BCC) librarians Emily Brown and Susan Souza-Mort had been using the LEAP VALUE Information Literacy Rubric to assess the information literacy skills of students at BCC. When ACRL announced the Framework, Emily & Susan created a rubric based on the Framework (with inspiration from LEAP) in order to evaluate students against the new standards. Find out how to apply the framework to a rubric, assess students in information literacy, and work with faculty to incorporate these skills in their classes and assignments.

Participants will:

  • Learn how to apply the Framework Rubric in assessment practice.
  • Learn how to work with faculty to start a successful assessment collaboration.

Intended audience: Some experience with the topic

A Match Made in Framework Heaven
Beate Gersch (University of Akron)

You don't have to be a journalist to turn your library instruction session into a press conference! This session provides an example of a collaborative project between a librarian and a journalism professor that turns the staid one-shot library session into an interactive press conference. Students in an introductory Newswriting course are asked to attend a mock press conference held by the subject liaison librarian. The librarian serves as a "press speaker," who introduces students to library resources in the context of a particular "event" at the library, ranging from the launch of a new database, to the celebration of Banned Books Week. Turning the library instruction session into a press conference taps into the multiple roles of the metaliterate learner as researcher, participant, and producer. Find out how this approach adds a new dimension to "Research as Inquiry" and lets students experience firsthand that even their own "Authority is Constructed and Contextual." Examples will be provided on how librarians can collaborate with faculty across the curriculum to incorporate the press conference format or other journalistic-type assignments to provide students with the opportunity to conduct research outside of the traditional parameters of a term paper. The argument is made that these types of assignments and library instruction engage students more deeply in the research process and provide a deeper sense of self-reflection of their role as a researcher.

Participants will be able to:

  • Identify library resources as "events" for instructional collaboration.
  • Adopt at least two information literacy frames in order to engage students more deeply as consumers and producers of information.

Intended audience: Brand new to topic, Some experience with the topic

Affective and Effective: How One New Test of Information Literacy is Taking the Dispositions Head-on
April Cunningham (Palomar College)

This presentation describes a new test to measure students' IL dispositions. Combining a knowledge test with a dispositional scale, this tool is intended to be used to gather the data needed for program review and accreditation reports as well as for course-level assessments that inform teaching. The learning outcomes and descriptions of situational dispositions that are at the heart of the test create a new layer of common concepts that we hope will facilitate conversations about information literacy across institutions and between segments of higher education. The presenter will share situational dispositions that the test measures, offer examples of test items along with their theoretical foundation, and review results from a field test and cognitive interviews conducted with students.

Participants will be able to:

  • Define IL dispositions in order to plan for assessment.
  • Identify strategies for developing assessments of IL dispositions that can be used on a large scale.
  • Evaluate an existing large-scale tool for assessing IL dispositions.

Intended audience: Some experience with the topic, Considerable experience with the topic

Becoming USERs of the Framework: Building new information literacy instructional practices in a library faculty learning community
Amanda Nichols Hess (Oakland University)
- Presentation (Google Docs)
- Resources (Google Sites)

Learn how one academic library used a faculty learning community to explore the new Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education while bolstering librarians' instructional design and technology knowledge. With Booth's (2011) USER model as a structure for considering the new information literacy frames, this learning community helped librarians build theoretical knowledge and gain valuable hands-on instructional technology experience in real-world contexts. Come for the concrete structure that any institution could use to build librarians' instructional technology capacities; stay for the opportunities to discuss how approach is unique and scalable in other contexts or situations.

Participants will be able to:

  • Describe how one academic library implemented a library faculty learning community to develop understanding of the Framework while also building instructional technology capacity and increasing instructional design knowledge.
  • Explain how at least one aspect of library learning communities, or Booth's USER model, could be applied in their own setting to further professional learning and development.
  • Identify how the library learning community model could be adapted, scaled, or honed in other situations or future iterations.

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic, Considerable experience with the topic

Bridging the Gap between the Standards and the New Framework: How to Adapt Materials to Support the Threshold Concepts
Charissa Jefferson and Felicia Vertrees (California State University, Northridge)
- Presentation (Prezi)

Materials created using the ACRL Standards can still be utilized with the new Framework. The business librarian and online instruction librarian collaborated to create an experimental course designed around the Framework while embedding information literacy tutorials, which were created under the previous ACRL Standards. This was a new innovation of conceptualizing the potential of the previous Standards bridging with the new Framework. This gave the librarians freedom to interpret the Threshold Concepts while still using some previously created materials. The librarians used Moodle, a course management system, to create a class that supported the new Framework. The information literacy tutorials were based on the Standards and worked in tandem with the Threshold Concepts explained in the course.

Participants will be able to:

  • Adapt previously created materials to support the new Framework.
  • Use the case study to create instruction based on the new Framework.
  • Assess students' success in understanding the new Threshold Concepts.

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic, Considerable experience with the topic

Choosing Our Own Adventure: A Collaborative Threshold Concept Instruction Workshop
Gayle Schaub and Hazel McClure (Grand Valley State University)
- Presentation (.pptx)
- Handout (.docx)

In this session, editors/authors of recently-published book of threshold concept based lesson plans will discuss creating plans for instruction that use information literacy threshold concepts as their foundations. Presenters will introduce the book, then facilitate the process of deciding as a group which threshold concept to work with for the session. Participants see examples of lesson plans from the book, learn about the format and content of the lesson plans, and discuss how the lessons relate to the threshold concept and frame. The program also includes a mini-workshop where participants work in groups to draft an idea for an activity that teaches the chosen threshold concept. Participants will receive a template of a lesson plan so that after the conference they can flesh the lesson plans out in full.

Participants will:

  • Be able to identify aspects of their instruction that already engage with threshold concepts.
  • Develop a plan to teach using a particular threshold concept by tweaking an already existing lesson.

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic, Considerable experience with the topic

Context and Collaboration: Finding Common Ground with the Framework for Information Literacy in Studio Art Classes
Larissa Garcia and Jessica Labatte (Northern Illinois University)
- Presentation (.pdf)

The new framework provides an opportunity to find common ground with other disciplines in order to contextualize information literacy in a way that is more meaningful for faculty and students. This presentation describes the collaboration between a Design and Media Arts faculty member and the Information Literacy librarian to integrate information literacy into advanced studio photography classes. By using the frame "scholarship as conversation" to identify the similarities between the research process and the creative process, they were able to help students view information literacy and multidisciplinary research as an important way to develop their artistic vision and improve the quality of their work. Most interesting, student surveys and faculty observations suggest that the information literacy session and research requirements of the course were particularly useful in preparing students for their studio critiques. Details about the assignments used and library sessions taught, as well as assessment results, lessons learned, and changes made will be shared. Through our experience, we hope to show how the framework can be used to find common ground for outreach discussions and to expand library instruction, not just in art programs, but in other departments as well.

Participants will:

  • Identify ways in which the frames can be used to find common ground with other disciplinary faculty and students.
  • Identify ways in which the frames can be used to contextualize information literacy and library instruction within other disciplines.
  • Recognize the opportunities for outreach and faculty collaboration within the frames.

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic, Considerable experience with the topic

Creating an Interdisciplinary Community of Practice for Teaching Subject Librarians around the ACRL Framework for Information Literacy
Andrea C. Kepsel, Julia Frankosky and Bobby L. Smiley (Michigan State University)
- Presentation (.pdf)
- Handout (.pdf)

How do subject librarians in different disciplines approach the ACRL Framework Information Literacy in relation to their instructional situations? How do scholars engage with information in their discipline, and how and when are students expected to learn engaging disciplinary information and threshold concepts? Posing these (and other related) questions can aid in our theoretical and practical understanding of the Framework. During this session librarians will discuss how participation in a Teacher Librarian Community of Practice allowed them to examine and answer these questions as they applied to their unique instructional scenarios.

Participants will:

  • Design a collaborative approach for discussing the Framework at their own institution.
  • Identify disciplinary threshold concepts and place them in dialogue with Framework elements.

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic

Digital Labor and Metaliteracy: Students as Critical Participants in Profit-Driven Social Media Environments
Lauren Wallis (Christopher Newport University)
- Presentation (.pptx)

Assignments that require the sole use of traditional scholarly sources imply to students that open, digital environments have little value in an academic context. The Framework, with its grounding in metaliteracy, emphasizes the importance of students' roles as creators of online information. While librarians need to advocate for the inclusion of digital assignments in the curriculum, we also need to approach participatory online environments with a critical eye. Emerging discussions of digital labor offer a lens through which librarians and other educators can help students critically participate in open online spaces. One line of critique within the digital labor discussion focuses on "free" social media platforms that turn user behaviors such as posting and liking into massive monetary profits through targeted ad sales. Twenty-first century college students must recognize and critique their problematic identity as digital laborers, and class discussions and assignments stemming from the concept of digital labor can help students recognize that their participation in online spaces has value. This value is contradictory, problematic, and rich with areas for critique, because students can make meaningful contributions to discussions of social and political issues while simultaneously offering their personal data as profit for companies like Facebook and Twitter. This presentation uses the concept of digital labor to expand discussions of the Framework's theoretical and pedagogical potential, with specific emphasis on the frames Information has Value and Information Creation as Process.

Participants will:

  • Identify specific lesson plans, assignments, and discussion prompts they can use in information literacy instruction to help students take a critical stance toward their digital creation practices.
  • Discuss and describe positive and negative aspects of creating online information in profit-driven social media environments.
  • Develop strategies for using the concept of digital labor to advocate to subject faculty and administrators about the relevance of the Framework and digital information.

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic, Considerable experience with the topic

Facilitating Student Learning Outcome Conversations Using the Framework
Lyda Ellis (University of Northern Colorado) and Andrea Falcone (University of Colorado Denver)
- Presentation (.pptx)

With the development of the Framework many librarians are wondering if they have to start from scratch when thinking about their instruction. Are we teaching the right concepts? Do we need to change our student learning outcomes? We've had the same questions at our institutions. We will discuss a process of writing student learning outcomes using the Framework-a process that is applicable to all types of instruction, from one-shots to credit courses.

Participants will:

  • Be able to implement by the end of the session a process for developing student learning outcomes using the Framework.

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic

Framing New Frames: Expanding the Conceptual Space and Boundaries
Lisa Janicke Hinchliffe (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign) and Laura Saunders (Simmons College)
- Presentation (.pdf)

Discussion, scholarship, and professional development offerings that have emerged related to the ACRL Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education have focused on implementing the six frames/concepts that are detailed within the Framework. This is understandable given the complexity of the Framework and the challenges it presents to standard information literacy program practices. Nonetheless, the Framework also issues an invitation to exploration and location adaptation that is worthy of attention. This session accepts that invitation and provides cases studies in developing additional frames/concepts - "information social justice" and "information apprenticeship in community" - as well as a process for articulating additional frames.

Participants will:

  • Recognize the opportunity for developing new frames within the ACRL Framework.
  • Become aware of additional frames/concepts that have been articulated by others within the ACRL Framework.
  • Be prepared to adopt and/or adapt a process for articulating additional frames at their own institutions.

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic, Considerable experience with the topic

Hashtag That! Using the ACRL Framework and Twitter to Collect Quick, Qualitative Assessment from Students
Charissa Powell (Kansas State University) and Rachel Gammons (University of Maryland)
- Presentation (Haiku Deck)

Trying to obtain meaningful assessment data from large-scale information literacy programs is tough. If you are tired of multiple choice tests, one-minute papers, and citation analysis, come learn about a new way to tackle assessment. Presenters will discuss a recent pilot in which students Tweeted quick, qualitative responses following their English 101 instruction sessions. Responses were collected using an open-source archiving tool, then analyzed and coded against select dispositions within the the ACRL Framework.

Participants will:

  • Be able to analyze the ACRL Framework to determine which components would be most appropriate for a one-shot learning assessment at their home institutions.
  • Utilize the tenants of six-word memoirs to design a qualitative assessment prompt to measure information literacy. Be able to apply open-source analysis tools to collect assessment Tweets at their home institutions.
  • Be able to apply open-source analysis tools to collect assessment Tweets at their home institutions.

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic

Information Literacy by Design: Unlocking the Potential of the ACRL Information Literacy Framework
Jonathan McMichael (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill) and Liz McGlynn (Western New England University)
- Presentation (Google Docs)

The beauty of the ACRL Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education lies in its lack of structure. Instead of striving for the uniform "Information Literate Student" the Framework applies threshold concept theory to explain how the "big ideas" of information literacy transform a student's understanding. While librarians might feel energized by the creative possibility this affords, they may just as easily feel frozen in place. In order to truly embrace the Framework, we librarians have to look elsewhere for structure that allows us to apply its principles to our own specific teaching and learning needs. UNC's Undergraduate Library has recently adapted Wiggins and McTighe's Understanding by Design (UbD) to create a department-wide tool for planning IL instruction entitled Information Literacy by Design (ILbD). ILbD provides a lesson designer with a step-by-step planning process that translates the Framework's theory into attitudes and understandings that students can apply to authentic research contexts. Based on the principles of backward design, "big ideas," authentic assessment, "uncoverage," and transferability, ILbD has encouraged a mindset among our instructors that values evidence-based instruction and authentic student performance. In this session, learn how we are using Information Literacy by Design to unlock the nuanced and adaptable descriptions of information literacy development offered by the Framework. By drawing from our practical insight, we'll demonstrate how a UbD mentality can improve the quality of instruction by placing student understanding first and making the Framework concepts actionable in the classroom.

Participants will:

  • Recognize how principles of UbD, including backward design, focus on "big ideas," authentic assessment, and transferability can be utilized to unlock the potential of the ACRL Framework.
  • Become familiar with the "Information Literacy by Design" (ILbD) model developed and used by UNC's Undergraduate Library and its implications for lesson planning and pedagogical practice.
  • Understand how integrating ILbD into instruction practices and training has developed a mindset among instructors that values evidence-based instruction and authentic student performance.

Intended audience: Some experience with the topic, Considerable experience with the topic

Logic Models: A Backwards Design Model for Aligning and Assessing your IL program
Karen P. Nicholson (University of Guelph)
- Presentation (.pdf)

Program logic models are a useful tool for program planning and assessment but they are not commonly used in the context of academic libraries. Logic models link short- and long-term goals and outcomes with program activities, providing IL program coordinators and librarians with a clear road map. In addition, because they provide a visual representation of a program, logic models can be used to communicate with and get feedback from diverse audiences and stakeholders. In this session, we will consider the affordances and constraints of using logic models for aligning and assessing IL programs that use the Framework. Logic models share a number of key characteristics with the Framework: they use a backwards design model, like the one that informs Wiggins and McTighe's (2005) Understanding by Design (UbD) model, to focus on big picture issues like program impact on student dispositions and values. Using the principle of constructive alignment, another key concept in UbD, logic models reveal the (mis)alignment between program outcomes and activities (e.g. credit-course teaching, one-shots, online learning supports). This interactive presentation, participants will learn the basic principles of backwards design and constructive alignment as they apply to logic models and IL programs. Working in small groups, they will then use a sample logic model developed using the ACRL's Standards for Libraries in Higher Education and the Framework to gain insights into identifying and rectifying (mis)alignments between desired IL program impacts, outcomes, and activities.

Participants will be able to:

  • Describe how the principles of backwards design and constructive alignment that inform logic models can be used in order to design effective IL programs.
  • Apply the principles of constructive alignment in order to identify appropriate programmatic activities and assessments using identified program impacts and outcomes from the Standards for Libraries and the Framework.
  • Describe the basic principles of backwards design in order to identify and rectify (mis)alignments between desired IL program impacts, outcomes and activities.

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic

No Shushing in the Library: Demonstrating the Framework with TED Talks
Stephanie A. Diaz (Penn State Erie, The Behrend College)

Instruction librarians are unique proponents of lifelong learning, however, we are often limited by brief interactions with students during one-shot sessions. By proactively offering academic programming, librarians can meaningfully engage with students outside of the classroom. TED Talks are highly popular videos featuring, "ideas worth spreading" (TED.com). Due to the diverse range of ideas presented, the Talks provide an excellent base for such programs. Explore ways TED Talks have been utilized in and outside of the classroom, and come learn how to use them to actively demonstrate Scholarship as a Conversation and Searching as Strategic Exploration.

Participants will:

  • Design a TED Talk screening or lesson plan for their institution.

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic

Picking up STEAM: Grounding the Framework for Information Literacy in the disciplines using STEM + Art as case studies
Rebecca Kuglitsch and Alex Watkins (University of Colorado Boulder)
- Presentation (.pdf)
- Worksheet (.pdf)

We will explore the framework as applied in both STEM and art information literacy instruction and open a discussion on contextualizing the frames in the disciplines. We will present our experience applying the frames in the seemingly disparate contexts of STEM and the arts, and how those disparities create synergies when brought together. Our case study is an environmental design instruction session that brought together both exploration of scientific literature and design research. Participants will develop a strategy for transferring the frames to their own area of subject expertise and be inspired to draw on the connections between different fields.

Participants will:

  • Be able to apply a strategy to develop instruction ideas in order to teach the frames in their own disciplinary contexts.
  • Recognize commonalities and variety underlying instruction in the frames across wide-ranging disciplinesin order to present the ideas behind the frames as complex and nuanced

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic

Project Redesign: Using the ACRL Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education to Bridge the Core Curriculum
Alexandra Hauser and Michelle Blank (Defiance College)
- Presentation (.pdf)
- Handout (.pdf)

Driven by a campus curriculum overhaul, the library staff at Defiance College, a small liberal-arts based institutions, redesigned their information literacy program in order to incorporate the ACRL Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education. This redesign centered on one course in the college's new CORE curriculum, Foundations of Academic Inquiry, and incorporated elements of the Framework to create a strong and intentional program aimed at building students' academic and critical thinking skills. This session will showcase how library staff at Defiance College supported students in the freshman research course through collaborative and mindful library instruction while incorporating elements of the Framework. We will also discuss how further adoption of the Framework has influenced and been incorporated into the institution's information literacy program which now spans across numerous courses within the Core Curriculum. Further, we hope to provide ideas and inspiration for scaling examples for participants of this session.

Participants will:

  • Explore one library's collaboration with campus curriculum in order to identify potential insertion points for information literacy and the Framework within their home institutions.
  • Identify practical strategies for integrating the Framework into institutional curriculum in order to implement programs that reinforce and build upon the core concepts of the Framework.

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic

Salutations over Citations: Welcoming Students to the Scholarly Conversation
Emily Scharf (Webster University) and Michaela D. Willi Hooper (University of Colorado Boulder)
- Presentation (Google Docs)

Students often struggle with the appropriate use of scholarly sources. Underlying this skill set are complex concepts: scholarship is a conversation, the scholarly community has its own unique perspectives and biases, not all scholarly information is equally credible or appropriate for all situations. This session will address how we discuss concepts surrounding the scholarly conversation with students using a constructivist approach. We will share how we have introduced students to these important concepts through reddit, blogs, Facebook, and more. Participants will complete an activity where they take a popular culture conversation and turn it into a lesson for their students.

Participants will:

  • Identify teaching strategies and/or activities with which to teach the ACRL frames 'scholarship is a conversation' and 'authority is constructed and contextual'.
  • Integrate conversations about social media in their own teaching strategies for these two frames.
  • Analyze the ways that the frames and social media challenge current academic systems and present the possibility for more voices to be heard.

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic, Considerable experience with the topic

Stacking the Deck: Building a Set of Information Literacy Student Learning Outcome Cards for your Instruction Program
Adrienne Button Harmer and Bethany Havas (Georgia Gwinnett College)
- Presentation (.pptx)
- Handout (.pdf)

In this session, we will discuss how the Georgia Gwinnett College (GGC) Library created a deck of information literacy student learning outcome cards and how we use the cards to map our institutional and departmental learning objectives across the curriculum, by discipline, by major, and for individual classes. These cards are the key building blocks of our information literacy program. We can sort (and re-sort) the cards as needed to generate essential questions/big ideas, to connect these questions to our student learning outcomes, and to map the big ideas and the related skills and abilities across four levels of proficiency in order to construct our own institutional benchmarks of student achievement. You will learn how to adapt our process for your institution and will play with our card deck to practice building modules of instruction. After attending this session you will be able to create and use your own set of information literacy student learning outcome cards for your institution or program.

Participants will be able to:

  • Create their own set of information literacy student learning outcome cards for their home institution or program.
  • Use the cards to create modules of information literacy instruction.

Intended audience: Some experience with the topic, Considerable experience with the topic

The Framework Is Constructed and Contextual: Context as a Starting Point for Instructional Planning
Andrea Baer (Indiana University)
- Presentation (.pptx)

The conceptual and open-ended nature of the Framework on one hand encourages creative and flexible pedagogical approaches that are sensitive to local contexts. On the other hand, this very strength in the Framework simultaneously presents challenging questions about how we shape both our everyday teaching and our longer-term curricular planning. How do we begin to concretize how abstract ideas explored in the Framework might look in our classrooms? While librarian discussions about applications of the ACRL Framework appear most often to begin with interpretations of its six frames, the contextual and interconnected nature of the Framework's threshold concepts suggests that effective instructional planning might often begin with reflection on the given learning context and on authentic tasks done in a relevant community of practice (for example, historians might analyze archival materials, while journalists interview individuals with different perspectives in order to gain a fuller perspective on an issue). An approach that begins with an identified context and task(s) and that then moves to considering broader conceptual views can help to ground more abstract ideas with practices and processes situated within particular social or disciplinary communities. This foregrounding of context and of authentic learning tasks can facilitate a process-oriented and sequenced approach to instruction that is essential to information literacy integration. In this interactive workshop, participants will explore the use of such an approach, as they develop instruction plans while engaging with a series of targeted questions that can guide such work. pedagogical approach.

Participants will:

  • Recognize ways in which the ACRL Framework foregrounds the contextual and social nature of research and information use.
  • Explore a context-oriented approach to instructional and curricular planning that draws on ideas from the ACRL Framework.
  • Develop a preliminary instruction plan that applies elements of the ACRL Framework through responding to a series of questions about a specific learning task and processes and conceptual understandings related to it.

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic, Considerable experience with the topic

The Great Frame Up: Getting Your Instruction to Fit the Framework
Ava Brillat, Lisa Baker and Lauren Fralinger (University of Miami)
- Presentation (.pptx)
- Presentation (.pdf)

The transition from the ACRL Standards to the Framework may seem daunting. In this session, three instructor librarians from the University of Miami will share their experiences with audience members. Lauren, an instruction librarian with a background in education, will discuss the unique instruction challenges of librarianship, including the constraints of the traditional one-shot session and the role of the librarian as a supplementary instructor. She will share her insights from the perspective as a trained teacher, sharing insights on scaffolding, student motivation, and pedagogy for the college student. Ava, an instruction librarian who has made the shift from using the Standards to the Framework, will discuss how the Framework has changed her teaching. Comparing and contrasting lesson plans and activities, she will share how she uses both the Standards and Framework together. She will also share her experience with how teaching from the Framework has changed her classroom experience. Lisa, an instruction librarian considering the Framework, will share her exploration of the Framework and how to apply it to teaching. She'll share her insight on which frames could be the most helpful, based on her instruction experience with the Standards. Lisa will also share some of the larger questions she is tackling as she considers transitioning from the Standards to the Framework. By sharing three different librarian perspectives, the presenters hope to engage the audience in a deeper exploration of the Framework through the use of practical examples, theoretical teaching knowledge, and instruction experience.

Participants will be able to:

  • Explore questions related to adopting the Framework into their teaching in order to better visualize their teaching transformation.
  • Compare and contrast two different lesson plans and activities (one based on the Standards, the other on the Framework) in order to determine how the Framework impacts instruction.
  • Relate their current teaching experiences with educational pedagogy practices that can be applied to their teaching.

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic

Threshold Concepts and Practitioner Research: Can Stumbling Blocks in Learning Lead to Building Blocks in Teaching?
Sharon Mader (Association of College & Research Libraries)
- Presentation (.pptx)
- Bibliography Handout (.docx)

The foundation and inspiration for the ACRL Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education comes from the work of Wiggins and McTighe, along with threshold concept research and practice. While the Understanding by Design model has helped us to uncover essential understandings to shape instructional design, the significance of threshold concepts is that they can guide us to finding the stumbling blocks in student learning. What is the gap between what we teach and what students learn? What is difficult to learn, and to teach, and why? If we can identify the places where students get stuck, we can then revise and redesign instruction and curricula. This presentation will present examples from research studies on threshold concepts for undergraduate and graduate students that illustrate approaches that librarians can adapt for practitioner research projects to uncover student learning and improve teaching, using such methods as semi-structured interviews, focus groups, and surveys. Threshold concept research emphasizes the importance of engaging students, faculty, and other educational partners, such as librarians, in an interactive and reflective dialogue about learning and teaching which leads to an iterative process of instructional design and re-design. The ACRL Framework provides the foundation for this conversation and the frames provide the outline for the conceptual understandings on the path from novice to expert. Through practitioner research projects and evidence-based practice, librarians can become more effective partners in the scholarship of teaching and learning as we collaborate to improve the quality of our teaching and its impact on student learning.

Participants will be able to:

  • Describe how stumbling blocks in student learning can be identified through threshold concept research.
  • Choose relevant methodologies that can be used to design practitioner research projects concerning threshold concepts and student learning.
  • List key implications of threshold concepts for course design.

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic

Transfer's Role in the 'Big Ideas' of Information Literacy
Mary Snyder Broussard (Lycoming College)
- Presentation (.pptx)

Information literacy (along with the reading, writing, and critical thinking abilities in which it is embedded) is one of the most important skills to be gained from college for future professions and general lifelong learning. However, in order to become lifelong learners, students must be able to transfer their information literacy skills from one context to another. Transfer is also a central element in Wiggins and McTighe's 'Big Ideas,' the primary conceptual underpinning of the six frames in the ACRL's final draft of The Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education. While the LIS literature mentions transfer frequently, it contains almost no studies on how or if students do transfer information literacy skills between classes or to their post-graduate lives. Librarians can begin to fill the gap in the research by looking at what researchers know about facilitating the transfer of reading and writing skills. Studies have continuously shown that most students struggle to transfer these skills on their own, either within a discipline or to other disciplines. Librarians can work with teaching faculty to facilitate information literacy transfer by teaching metacognition and helping students make connections between their previous knowledge and new contexts.

Participants will be able to:

  • Define the term "transfer" as it is used in the education literature.
  • Apply transfer theory to information literacy, especially as it relates to teaching reading and writing.
  • Name several ways in which information literacy transfer can be assessed.

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic

Translating the Framework into Your Current Practice: Taking the Next Step Into the Threshold Concepts
Jo Angela Oehrli and Diana Perpich (University of Michigan)
- Presentation (.pdf)

Using a hands-on, active learning technique the presenters will engage attendees in a Jigsaw exercise which they administered to library instructors at their home institution. This exercise challenges participants to translate the Frames into current practice in order to extend library instructors' working knowledge of the Framework. The presentation will also provide best practices for leading a Framework Jigsaw activity at their own institutions. By the end of the presentation, attendees should have an idea of how sharing examples from current practice can bolster the collective confidence in their own instructional corps' ability to successfully transition to Framework teaching.

Participants will:

  • Be able to map the Framework to their current instructional practice in order to identify gaps and strengths in their instructional program.
  • Be able to implement the Jigsaw activity at their home institution in order to further professional development around the Framework.
  • After completing the activity, attendees may see how sharing examples from current practice can bolster collective confidence in their instructional corps' teaching capacity which may provide a more successful transition to Framework teaching.

Intended audience: Some experience with the topic

Writing with the Framework: Collaborating and Integrating Information Literacy into First-Year Writing Curricula
Kate Langan (Western Michigan University)
- Presentation (.pptx)

This session will focus on the collaboration between library and writing faculty, which culminated in aligning and integrating the ACRL Framework across the curriculum of a large first year writing (FYW) program. Librarians developed 12 lessons that, together, teach to all 6 of the ACRL frames. These lessons are published in the course textbook and are supplemented by online videos, tutorials, and research guides. All FYW instructors are required to incorporate these lessons and exercises into their curriculum. However, the lessons and exercises are designed to be short and flexible so that they can assign them in whatever order best suits their needs. This presentation will 1) elaborate on the need for a shared pedagogical commitment when mapping the Framework onto FYW curricula, 2) highlight the cooperative process of developing learning outcomes, lesson plans, and assessment materials anchored by the Framework, 3) discuss the logistics of implementing this collaborative curriculum throughout the semester, and 4) briefly describe a current study designed to measure the effectiveness of this initiative.

Participants will:

  • Develop techniques and strategies for promoting the ACRL Framework to non-library faculty and administrators.
  • Identify partnerships with non-library faculty to develop and implement information literacy learning goals, lessons, exercises, and assessment materials for a large-scale writing programs.

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic, Considerable experience with the topic